Weekly Photo Challenge – Old Fashioned


My Mom and Dad use to be antique collectors and when I was a child, I was amazed with the Carnival  glass. As I have gotten older they have passed on some of their antique carnival glass to me. I especially love the blue kind.

This is a bowl that I have sitting in my counter-top. It collects our keys, pens, etc.

Carnival glass originated as a glass called ‘Iridill’, produced beginning in 1908 by the Fenton Art Glass Company (founded in 1905). Iridill was inspired by the fine blown art glass of such makers as Tiffany and Steuben, but did not sell at the anticipated premium prices and was subsequently discounted. After these markdowns, Iridill pieces were used as carnival prizes.

Iridil became popular and very profitable for Fenton, which produced many different types of items in this finish, in over 150 patterns. Fenton maintained their position as the largest manufacturer and were one of very few makers to use a red coloured glass base for their carnival glass. After interest waned in the late 1920s, Fenton stopped producing carnival glass for many years. In more recent years, due to a resurgence in interest, Fenton re-started production of carnival glass until its closure in 2007.

Most U.S. carnival glass was made before 1925, with production in clear decline after 1931. Some significant production continued outside the US through the depression years of the early 1930s, tapering off to very little by the 1940s.

Often the same moulds were used to produce clear and transparent coloured glass as well as carnival versions, so producers could switch production between these finishes easily according to demand. 

Courtesy of Wikipedia

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7 thoughts on “Weekly Photo Challenge – Old Fashioned

  1. I love antiques too. Among my most prized possessions are dishes circa 1913 of my grandmothers that my mother had passed down to me. They are fragile with wear and age, and now sit safely displayed in my parents curio cabinet I keep in my dining room, along with a lot of stemware. Treasure those things passed down, as they’re irreplaceable.

    1. Yes. I have some china from my grandma too. It was given to her from her husband who got it when he was in the Korean war…or something like that. I love walking around in antique stores and just spending hours browsing.

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